Spring Seasonal Preparedness

Click here to view SDOEM's Severe Weather Preparedness Guide (PDF)

Thunderstorms

In the United States lightning kills 300 people and injures 80 on average, each year. All thunderstorms produce lightning and all have the potential for danger. Those dangers can include tornadoes, strong winds, hail, wildfires and flash flooding, which is responsible for more fatalities than any other thunderstorm-related hazard.

Lightning's risk to individuals and property is increased because of its unpredictability. It often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall. Most lightning deaths and injuries occur when people are caught outdoors in the summer months during the afternoon and evening.

Preparing for a Thunderstorm and Lightning

  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a thunderstorm hazard, including understanding the difference between a severe thunderstorm watch and a severe thunderstorm warning.
  • A Thunderstorm watch means there is a possibility of a thunderstorm in your area.
  • A Thunderstorm warning means a thunderstorm is occurring or will likely occur soon. If you are advised to take shelter so immediately.
  • Get an emergency supply kit.
  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm.
  • Use the 30/30 lightning safety rule. If you see lightning and you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder, go indoors. Then stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.
  • Visit NOAA Watch for more weather-related information.

Have a Thunderstorm Plan

  • If a thunderstorm is likely in your area, postpone outdoor activities.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades, or curtains.
  • Avoid showering or bathing during a thunderstorm. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity.
  • Watch for darkening skies, lightning, increasing winds.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio for information.
  • Go quickly inside a home, building, or hard top automobile, if possible.
  • If shelter is not available go to the lowest area nearby and make yourself the smallest target possible but do not lie flat on the ground.
  • If on open water, get to land and shelter immediately.
  • Things to avoid include:
  • Tall, isolated tree in an open area.
  • Hilltops, open fields, the beach, a boat on the water, isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas.
  • Anything metal - tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles, golf carts, golf clubs, and bicycles.

Stay Informed

  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to your battery operated or hand crank NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • Do not use electrical items such as computers or television sets as power surges from lightning can cause serious damage.
  • A corded telephone should only be used in an emergency, but cordless phones and cell phones are safe to use.

For more information about NOAA Weather Radio visit http://www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning

Tornadoes

Tornadoes are nature's most violent storms.  They can appear suddenly, without warning, and can be invisible until dust and debris are picked up or a funnel cloud appears.  Planning and practicing specifically how and where you take shelter is a matter of survival.  Be prepared to act quickly.  Keep in mind that while tornadoes are more common in the Midwest, Southeast and Southwest, they can occur in any state and at any time of the year, making advance preparation vitally important.

Prepare for a Tornado

  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a tornado hazard.
  • A tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area.  You should monitor NOAA Weather Radio local radio and television news outlets for the latest developments.
  • A tornado warning is when a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.
  • Determine in advance where you will take shelter in case of a tornado warning.
  • Storm cellars or basements provide the best protection.
  • If underground shelter is not available, go into an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.  In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • Stay away from windows, doors and outside walls.  Go to the center of the room.  Stay away from corners because they attract debris.
  • A vehicle, trailer or mobile home does not provide good protection.  Plan to go quickly to a building with a strong foundation, if possible.
  • If shelter is not available, lie flat in a ditch or other low-lying area.  Do not get under an overpass or bridge.  You are safer in a low, flat location.
  • Plan to stay in the shelter location until the danger has passed.
  • Get a kit of emergency supplies. Store it in your shelter location.
  • Visit NOAA Watch for more weather-related information.

Plan to Take Shelter

  • If local authorities issue a tornado warning or if you see a funnel cloud.  Take shelter immediately.
  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do.  However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • Stay in the shelter location until the danger has passed.

Stay Informed

  • After a tornado be sure to remain out of damaged buildings and stay clear of downed power lines.
  • Help injured or trapped people.  Check on others who may require special assistance, such as the elderly, children and people with disabilities.
  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do.  However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.

For more information go to: http://www.ready.gov/tornadoes

Click here to download our children's tornado preparedness book, featuring Tommy the Turtle!

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